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I make clothes.
And talk about them.

Welcome. I’m here to talk about creating an intentional wardrobe that is ethical, affordable, beautiful, and comfortable. I mostly make yarn, knit, sew, thrift, and mend to do it.

Handspun Mittens :-D

Handspun Mittens :-D

One of the mittens I made for myself in college. They’ve seen better days, having spent a few too many hours in the barn.

One of the mittens I made for myself in college. They’ve seen better days, having spent a few too many hours in the barn.

The last time I made mittens for myself was in college. Which means these mittens are probably 10 years old. I had never made mittens before, and I didn’t own appropriately sized double pointed needles, so I knit them flat. And I knit them waaaay to small. So, being me, I improvised and added in a strip of blue along one side to make them wearable.

However, the acrylic yarn really didn’t do much to ad stop the wind, so a couple of years later, I lined them with extra flannel from a quilting project. And yaaaay! I had warm mittens that fit. However, I was ready for a change after all this time, and I finally set aside some time to knit myself a pair of mittens with wool and alpaca yarn I spun from my own flock.

Here you can see the blue band I knit to add width to the poorly fitting mittens.

Here you can see the blue band I knit to add width to the poorly fitting mittens.

The yarn I used wasn’t ideal for mittens, it was the final skein from my Bit of Funk sweater. This was a double-ply so that the sweater wouldn’t be too bulky. For mittens, I’d prefer to use a triple-ply. But I also wanted to use up this yarn before I moved. And I thought the thin yarn would be made up for in the two layers I was using.

Two layers? Why yes. I knit the outside of the mittens and then I picked up stitches inside and knit a second mitten inside. Technically, I could have just double-knit this, but I find that double-knitting takes me longer than just knitting two layers separately.

For the top half of the mitten, over my fingers, I made the lining layer out of Lightening’s triple-ply yarn which was delightful to work with. This is the same skein I used for my daughters’ Shetland mittens.

Lightening (the black alpaca) and Peach, the middle sheep provided the fiber for these mittens. This picture was taken last year, I don’t have Peach anymore and Lightening is still on the farm, but has been sold with my other alpacas awaiting their new farm home.

Lightening (the black alpaca) and Peach, the middle sheep provided the fiber for these mittens. This picture was taken last year, I don’t have Peach anymore and Lightening is still on the farm, but has been sold with my other alpacas awaiting their new farm home.

Lightening’s fleece from this year turned out buttery soft and exquisite. I love feeling these mittens slide on.

Lightening’s fleece from this year turned out buttery soft and exquisite. I love feeling these mittens slide on.

Here you can see how I finished knitting the outside of the mitten, turned them inside out and then picked up stitches above the cuff and knit the same mitten again.

Here you can see how I finished knitting the outside of the mitten, turned them inside out and then picked up stitches above the cuff and knit the same mitten again.

After the knitting portion was complete, I free-handed some embroidery in with the alpaca yarn to help hold the layers together and add a little beauty. I’m quite pleased with the way the flowers turned out. I am still considering adding a few beads here and there, but in the meantime, I’m wearing this quite a bit. I’m also considering sewing some leather patches over the palms to give them a bit of extra grip while shoveling all this dreadful (and beautiful) snow we’ve been getting.

Finished outside of mitten next to finished inside of mitten. You can see I used the alpaca lined over the coldest parts of my hands.

Finished outside of mitten next to finished inside of mitten. You can see I used the alpaca lined over the coldest parts of my hands.

No pattern out for these since I believe there are plenty of other free mitten patterns and they are easy enough to draft yourself for your own hands. Feel free to shoot me an email or find my on IG if you need any tips or help.

I will share this picture of Lightening and Kyah every chance I get. They are so cute together. I cannot recommend alpacas enough. They are great livestock.

I will share this picture of Lightening and Kyah every chance I get. They are so cute together. I cannot recommend alpacas enough. They are great livestock.

Low-rise to High-rise Jeans

Low-rise to High-rise Jeans

4 Ethical Undies Options: Find affordable options for underduds that are ethically made

4 Ethical Undies Options: Find affordable options for underduds that are ethically made