.

I make clothes.
And talk about them.

Welcome. I’m here to talk about creating an intentional wardrobe that is ethical, affordable, beautiful, and comfortable. I mostly make yarn, knit, sew, thrift, and mend to do it.

Fashion Revolution 2019

Fashion Revolution 2019

It’s been a super busy week. My house is going on the market tomorrow. I’ve been riding as much as I can since the weather has been GORGEOUS and I’ve been working on my other favorite hobbies. Last week I delivered yarn from my first fleece of the season (which I finished in one week!). Turns out I can work pretty fast for kid-craft yarn that isn’t too clean!

In other news, I refurbished a pair of jeans and I LOOOOOOVE them, but I will share more on those later. The girls have been wearing their cotton lawn dresses and sun hats from last year and they’ve even requested bonnets for our upcoming camping trip. Oh my!

In honor of the week, I’m not posting any pretty pictures or personal projects. I’m just going to give you a super-fast overview of how I view Fashion Revolution’s goals.

This is FASHION REVOLUTION WEEK. Six years ago over 1,000 people died in a factory that made clothing for several big brands, including Walmart. You can learn a few more details about the event on Wikipedia.

Why would so many people die in the slow collapse of a building that had shown signs of it’s impending death the day before? Workers were ordered to return to work in the fast-fashion factories of the building even though other businesses inside had closed. This is because the insatiable demand of western consumerism has a short attention span, and the clothes being made now, need to reach markets as quickly as possible in order to compel folks to buy as much as we can before the next shipment comes in.

Of course a disaster on this scale has many many aspects and failures of oversight across the spectrum. But the fact of the matter is, people died making cheap clothes that would be worn only a handful of times by an indifferent population.

If the idea of working in substandard conditions and even losing your life for crappy polyester clothes doesn’t sit well with you. You’re not alone. The Rana Plaza disaster birthed the Fashion Revolution movement, which encourages clothing consumers to ask “who made my clothes”. This question helps us remember that people NOT machines do not make clothes. And those people are paying a dearly for the cheap clothes people buy.

If you don’t want to make your own clothes (I deleted the word can’t in that sentence because I believe anyone CAN), then consider asking your favorite brands to ensure their workers are paid fairly. Part of which means you must be willing to pay a living wage for your clothes.

If you can’t afford to pay $40 for a shirt, you can buy secondhand. OR you can learn to build your own wardrobe. If you’d like to do even more. You can follow Fashion Revolution or check out their website: https://www.fashionrevolution.org/about/get-involved/

Of course, I’m always happy to answer questions, help mend, or just help you lovely folks build a sustainable wardrobe you love. Send me a message or comment how you help change our fashion industry to be slower and more intentional!

Jeans Refashion

Jeans Refashion

Trash Jacket

Trash Jacket